Pre- & Post- Conference Symposia

Endangered Species Act Sections 7 and 10 Symposium:

  • February 22-23, 2016:  Monday, 1-5:30pm and concludes Tuesday, 8:30am -5:30pm
  • Requires Extra Fee
  • A one and a half day symposium on the ESA, immediately before the 2016 Annual Meeting of The Western Section of The Wildlife Society
  • We strongly recommend that you select one of the subsidized lunch options listed on the registration page.  There are few lunch options near the conference center and lunch breaks are scheduled for just one hour.
  • Link to Agenda
  • Link to Online Materials
  • Link to ESA Meeting Evaluation Results

The objectives of this symposium are to introduce the fundamental principles and practices involved in the Federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) consultation and permitting processes. Specifically, section 7(a)(1) of the ESA charges Federal agencies to utilize their resources and authorities to further the conservation of listed species, and section 7(a)(2) requires the agencies, through consultation with the Services, to ensure that their activities are not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of listed species or adversely modify designated Critical Habitat. Section 10(a)(1) authorizes issuance of permits for scientific research and related actions, whereas 10(a)(2) can authorize otherwise-prohibited take of listed species under certain circumstances by issuance of incidental take permits.  Applicants for incidental take permits are required to submit documents, commonly known as Habitat Conservation Plans (HCPs), which typically must include detailed minimization and mitigation measures, as well as an alternatives analysis.

This symposium will focus on “pieces” of the sections 7(a) and 10(a) processes and will emphasize examples that are relevant to Sections 7 and 10 practitioners in the western U.S.  Brief discussions of other relevant developments (such as “Safe Harbor” and the recent section 4(d) rules) will be included.

Symposium:   Mohave Ground Squirrel and Amargosa Vole – Ecology and Conservation of Low Profile Species in the Mojave Desert

  • February 22-23, 2016:  Monday 1-5:30pm and concludes Tuesday, 8:30am -5:30pm
  • Requires Extra Fee
  • A one and a half day symposium on the Amargosa vole and Mohave ground squirrel, immediately before the 2016 Annual Meeting of The Western Section of The Wildlife Society
  • We strongly recommend that you select one of the subsidized lunch options listed on the registration page.  There are few lunch options near the conference center and lunch breaks are scheduled for just one hour.
  • Link to Agenda/Program
  • Link to Online Materials
  • Link to Mammals Meeting Evaluation Results

In each of three sections, the similarities and differences between the only two listed small mammals in the Mojave Desert will be discussed:

SECTION 1 – Ecological and Evolutionary Setting
SECTION 2 – Climate Change and Population Dynamics
SECTION 3 – Conservation, Threats and Management

vole-lg

Photo by Don Preisler/UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Amargosa Vole
The Amargosa vole has one of the most restricted ranges of any mammal in North America. Distributed disjunctly in less than 1 km2 of remnant wetland habitat in the Amargosa River in the Mojave Desert, it was listed as endangered by federal and state agencies in the early 1980’s. It was virtually ignored for decades, but over the last five years a series of studies on its distribution, genetics, demography, population dynamics, habitat use, habitat condition, and disease all point to it being one of the most endangered mammals not only in the Mojave Desert but on the North American continent. Despite the isolated setting of the vole, the process of conserving its population represents a more general situation of how to implement effective management actions in an environment of competing interests, diminishing resources, and considerable political and environmental uncertainty.

 

Mohave-ground-squirrel

Photo by Dr. Philip Leitner

Mohave Ground Squirrel
The Mohave Ground Squirrel is endemic to the western Mojave Desert, with one of the smallest ranges among North American mammals at less than 20,000 km2. It is listed as Threatened by the State of California, but a petition for federal listing was rejected by the USFWS in 2011. It has been impacted by multiple threats, including grazing, mining, off-road recreation, agricultural development, and urban expansion. Determining the habitat requirements of this species has presented a challenge for scientists. Renewable energy development may present a new challenge, while future climate change projections make its long-term future seem tenuous. Conservation planning to protect important habitat and linkages is urgently needed.

Thank you to our sponsor:

Zdon logo

Additional sponsorship opportunities available.  Contact sirsnave@verizon.net for more information.

 

Wildlife Biologist Construction Awareness Training (WildC.A.T.)

  • February 23, 2016:  Tuesday 1-5pmWildC.A.T. logo
  • Requires Extra Fee, to be announced soon
  • A half day afternoon workshop immediately before the 2016 Annual Meeting of The Western Section of The Wildlife Society
  • Limited to the first 36 registrants

Wildlife biologists are often called on to provide technical expertise and implement protective measures on construction sites, but rarely receive practical training in environmental permits or safety training as they enter the workforce. This half-day workshop provides an introduction to construction monitoring for recent graduates, early career professionals, and regular construction monitors, and will be taught by experienced wildlife biologists, construction personnel, and health and safety officers. Learn about the environmental permits that require construction monitoring, what to expect on construction job sites, situational awareness and health and safety basics, common environmental protection issues and Best Management Practices, effective communication techniques with construction crews, and useful tools of the trade. Upon completion of the workshop, attendees will receive a certificate of completion and helmet sticker that shows prospective employers and construction personnel in the field that they have attended WildC.A.T. training.

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