For more than 75 years, The Wildlife Society has been influencing the future of wildlife and wild places for the benefit of generations to come.

The Wildlife Society National Chapter logo with wildlife illustrations in a hieroglyphic style

The Wildlife Society Hawai‘i Chapter

The Wildlife Society Hawai‘i Chapter dedicates itself to the conservation and preservation of flora and fauna endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. The Hawai‘i Chapter is part of the Western Section of The Wildlife Society. Its membership is drawn from Honolulu, Kaua‘i, Mau‘i, and Hawai‘i (Big Island) counties.

TWS Hawai‘i Chapter’s objectives are to:

  • Promote the sound stewardship of wildlife and their habitats in Hawai‘i and the Pacific.
  • Promote the conservation of indigenous and endemic Hawaiian and other Pacific wildlife and their habitats.
  • Promote the development of knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for success of wildlife professionals and the conservation community in the State of Hawai‘i and Pacific.

The Wildlife Society

Founded in 1937, The Wildlife Society is an international non-profit scientific and educational association dedicated to excellence in wildlife stewardship through science and education. Our mission is to enhance the ability of wildlife professionals to conserve diversity, sustain productivity, and ensure responsible use of wildlife resources for the benefit of society. The Wildlife Society encourages professional growth through certification peer-review Publications, and Conferences. TWS is an international organization committed to addressing national and international issues that affect the current and future status of wildlife in North America and throughout the world.

Society members are dedicated to sustainable management of wildlife resources and their habitats. Ecology is the primary scientific discipline of the wildlife profession, therefore, the interests of the Society embrace the interactions of all organisms with their natural environments. The Society recognizes that humans, as other organisms, have a total dependency upon the environment. It is the Society’s belief also that wildlife, in its myriad forms, is basic to the maintenance of a human culture that provides quality living.

Meet the 2018 Members of the Board

Angela Amlin woman on beach with seagull on her head

Angela Amlin

President

Angela Amlin works for the Pacific Islands Regional Office of NOAA Fisheries as the Hawaiian Monk Seal Recovery Coordinator. She is responsible for leading recovery and management activities for the endangered Hawaiian monk seal alongside colleagues at NOAA’s Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, and in close coordination with partners and stakeholders. Prior to joining NMFS, Angela worked with the State of Hawaiʻi Division of Forestry and Wildlife focusing on the impacts of alternative energy projects on threatened and endangered seabirds, waterbirds, and bats. She has also worked for the State of California Department of Parks and Recreation, the World Wildlife Fund, and spent many years as an environmental consultant primarily working on endangered species impact assessment and mitigation planning. Angela received her Master of Environmental Management with a concentration in Conservation Science and Policy from Duke University. She has served as the Hawaiʻi Chapter Representative to the TWS Western Section since 2015, and the Hawaiʻi Chapter President since 2016.

Angela Amlin

President

Woman standing on mountain summit with mountain range in background, smiling at camera

Katie Ersbak

Vice-President

Katie Ersbak is a Watershed Planner with the State of Hawaiʻi, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife. She has B.A. in Urban Studies and Planning from the University of California, San Diego and a Masters Degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. Katie began her career at DLNR in 2011 when she worked for the Commission on Water Resource Management. Her experience working on water rights issues helped set the stage for a position with DOFAW where she currently coordinates statewide protection efforts for Hawaii’s native forests and watersheds working closely with groups like the Watershed Partnerships. As the head of DOFAW’s Watershed Partnerships Program, Katie provides funding to support the partnerships in their efforts to control ungulates, stop the spread of invasive weeds, build fences and engage with decision makers. She currently serves on several committees and advisory groups including the Hawaii Fish Habitat Partnership Steering Committee, the Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death Working Group, the West Maui Ridge2Reef FAST, and is as an ex-officio member of the Hawaiʻi Association of Watershed Partnerships.

Katie Ersbak

Vice President

The Wildlife Society Hawaii Chapter Board Member Lindsay Young

Lindsay Young

Treasurer

Lindsay Young earned a Bachelor of Science from the University of British Columbia and a Master of Science from the University of Hawaiʻi. In 2009, she completed her Ph.D. at the University of Hawaiʻi where her dissertation research focused on the population genetics, at sea foraging ecology, and conservation needs of Laysan Albatross. Lindsay has worked on numerous conservation projects in Hawaiʻi and the Pacific region over the last twelve years and was the project coordinator for the Kaʻena Point Ecosystem Restoration Project which installed the first predator proof fence in the U.S. at Kaʻena Point on Oahu. She is currently focused on translocating endangered, and sea level rise vulnerable seabirds into predator free enclosures on Kauaʻi and Oʻahu. Lindsay is on the affiliate graduate faculty of the University of Hawaiʻi, has authored several dozen scientific papers, served as the treasurer for the Pacific Seabird Group, the chair of the North Pacific Albatross Working Group, is the former North Pacific correspondent for ACAP (Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels), and as a reviewer for multiple refereed journals. Lindsay was one of the 2011 recipients of the US Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Champion Awards for her work on the Nihoa Millerbird Translocation, and in 2016 she was awarded a special achievement award from the Pacific Seabird Group for her work with Hawaiian seabirds.

Lindsay Young

Secretary

Woman standing on stony cliff with clipboard with rocky sea cliffs in background

Brenda Becker

Treasurer

Brenda Becker is a Biological Technician with the Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program at the National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center in Honolulu, Hawai’i. She holds a B.S. in Wildlife and Range Management from the University of Nevada-Reno. Brenda began working with the Hawaiian monk seal in 1985 and has extensive experience conducting monk seal field research at all sites in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, which entailed living and working for 3-6 months in remote, primitive field camps for 17 seasons. Currently, Brenda is more Oahu-based and manages the monk seal digital photo ID databases, assists with data management, and opportunistically conducts field work. Brenda is a TWS-Certified Wildlife Biologist. She has been an active member of TWS-Hawaii Chapter, serving as Chapter Representative TWS-Western Section 1993-94, Secretary from 2002-2010, Vice-President 2011, Chapter’s Newsletter editor 2011-2014, Vice President 2015, Secretary 2016, and Treasurer 2017.

Brenda Becker

Treasurer

Afsheen Siddiqi

Afsheen Siddiqi

Afsheen Siddiqi is the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Seabird and Waterbird Recovery Coordinator. Afsheen provides broad program coordination for avian conservation, specifically with regards to efforts to recover seabirds, waterbirds, and owls. She is responsible for grant and budget management, program review and development of recovery plans and project implementation and works collaboratively with a diversity of partners. Afsheen is dedicated and passionate about conservation issues in Hawaii and has worked on endangered species issues with the DLNR since 2011. Afsheen received her M.S. in Environmental Sciences focusing on Ecology from the University of Maryland Baltimore County in 2004. Prior to working at DLNR, she completed an Asia Pacific Leadership Program Fellowship with the East West Center with a focus on avian conservation efforts in Southeast Asia.

Afsheen Siddiqi

Conservation Affairs Committee Chair

Elliott Parsons

Membership Coordinator

Elliott Parsons is a natural area reserves specialist for the Hawai`i Division of Forestry and Wildlife at Pu`uwa`awa`a in North Kona, Hawai`i. Elliott manages grants, supervises a large crew of on-site staff, and works with a diversity of colleagues, partners, and collaborators on research, natural resource management, and conservation projects. He received his doctorate in Fish and Wildlife Biology from the University of Montana in 2011. In addition to his work at Pu`uwa`awa`a, Elliott serves as a Faculty Affiliate at the University of Hawai`i Hilo, and teaches Introduction to Wildlife Science for the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management. He has also served as Co-Chair of the Abstract Committee for the annual Hawai`i Conservation Conference since 2015, and serves on the Board of Ka`ahahui `O Ka Nāhelehele, a non-profit dedicated to the perpetuation of dryland forests in Hawai`i. Elliott joined the board of the Hawai`i Chapter of TWS in 2013 and has served as Chapter President and Conservation Affairs Coordinator in the past, and is currently the Membership Coordinator.

Elliott Parsons

Membership Coordinator

Rachel Sprague

Chapter Representative to the Western Section

Rachel Seabury Sprague is the wildlife biologist for Pūlama Lānaʻi, the company that owns and manages 98% of the island of Lānaʻi for the major private landowner. She leads the companyʻs wildlife programs, including monitoring and protection of endangered seabirds and tree snails, monk seals,and sea turtles, as well as monitoring to support game management, invasive species/predator control and biosecurity, and marine debris accumulation monitoring and removal. Rachel has been working in conservation and management of coastal and island wildlife for over 18 years from the Bay of Fundy in Canada, to Californiaʻs Channel Islands, to the main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. She received her B.A. in Biology and Environmental Studies from Bowdoin College (ME), and then her Ph.D. in Fish and Wildlife Biology from the University of Montana studying hormone physiology and behavior in Laysan albatross on Kaua‘i and Midway Atoll. After graduate school, she led a release program for captive-bred San Clemente loggerhead shrikes an endangered, predatory songbird) on San Clemente Island for the U.S. Navy and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, before returning to Hawaiʻi to spend over 5 years as the Hawaiian Monk Seal Recovery Coordinator with NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. Rachel also serves on the board of directors for the Hawai‘i Chapter of The Wildlife Society (past-president and chapter representative, the Western Section of The Wildlife Society (past-president and Hawaiʻi chapter rep), and the Conservation Council for Hawaiʻi - the National Wildlife Federation’s state affiliate (vice president and affiliate representative to NWF).

Rachel Sprague

Chapter Representative to the Western Section

Alex Wang

Member At-Large

Alex Wang is the Endangered Forest Bird Field Supervisor for the Natural Area Reserve System, a DOFAW Program on the Big Island. In his position, he is assisting with the Alala reintroduction, monitoring and improving habitat for Akiapola’au, and identifying critical seabird habitat and controlling for invasive mammalian predators. His interest in Ornithology began during his undergraduate education at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He then took many seasonal positions from banding Albatross in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, to nest-searching for California Wrentits, to monitoring Whiskered Auklets to name a few. He completed his M.S. at the University of Hawaii, Hilo, radio-tagging Akohekohe and hand-tracking them through high-elevation wet forest. He joined the Hawaii chapter of The Wildilfe Society in 2014 and became a member of the Board in 2017.

Alex Wang

Member At-Large